Angela Davis speaks at Wesleyan University (again) in 1993.

Stokely Carmichael speaks at Wesleyan University, as covered by The Wesleyan Argus.

(Reblogged from wretchedoftheearth)
I find it frustrating when people imply that there is no way to analyze power because it’s ubiquitous, fluid, and purely relational. The idea that power is impossible to possess, anchor, and pinpoint can suggest that power relations are completely socially unintelligible and impossible to examine. However, even though there is no external view of a fixed locus of power, there is still the possibility of illuminating alignments of power through an examination of webs of power relations and patterns of effects. That how we might arrive at an analysis of, say, patriarchy, which isn’t reducible to the concentration of power into the hands of men, but rather is maintained though “mobile, polymorphous, and contingent techniques of power” that include multiple strategies, whether it’s the naturalization of women’s inferiority in scientific discourses or the day-to-day performance of gender in order to be perceived as an intelligible human subject. Even Foucault was very aware that something like “constellations” of power or “alliances” exist even in the absence of absolutist and fixed configurations of power. Confluences and bundles of relations of power are produced within disciplinary configurations of power. These constellations can accrue power and resemble classical “oppression,” as links, alliances, and alignments of power coalesce.
[Jackie Wang]

(Source: loneberry)

Leftie chat lingo to help you understand your Maoist teen

beshitted:

DTF: Death To Fascists
LOL: Leave Others’ Land
OMG: Observe Mao’s Guidelines
ROFL: Radicalize Our Failing Liberals
WTF: Weaponize The Farmworkers

(Reblogged from exactlywhatiwasthinking)
An individual can never be an elitist, because the only proper application of the term “elite” is to groups. Any individual, regardless of how well-known that person may be, can never be an elite.

Correctly, an elite refers to a small group of people who have power over a larger group of which they are part, usually without direct responsibility to that larger group, and often without their knowledge or consent. A person becomes an elitist by being part of, or advocating the rule by, such a small group, whether or not that individual is well known or not known at all. Notoriety is not a definition of an elitist. The most insidious elites are usually run by people not known to the larger public at all. Intelligent elitists are usually smart enough not to allow themselves to become well known; when they become known, they are watched, and the mask over their power is no longer firmly lodged.
Praxis within any political movement that aims to have a radical transformative impact on society cannot be solely focused on creating spaces wherein would-be radicals experience safety and support. Feminist movement to end sexist oppression actively engages participants in revolutionary struggle. Struggle is rarely safe or pleasurable.
(Reblogged from loneberry)